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 Village sign

A brief history

Osbaldwick was referred to as "Osbaldeuuic" in the Domesday Book of 1086, from Osbald an earl in the royal clan of Northumbria who had authority in this, the southern part of the kingdom in the eighth century.

The heart of the village lies about half a mile below the crest of the Hull road which constitutes its southern boundary, and was formerly the South Easterly route of the Roman road leaving York (Eboracum) for the Humber port of Brough (Petuaria). This road lies on the ridge of the York Moraine. There used to be previously a number of "erratics" (huge boulders of pink coloured Shap granite) lying on Osbaldwick village green. These had been brought down from the Lake District and deposited during the retreat in the last ice cap from Yorkshire over many years. They are now on display in the Yorkshire Museum Gardens. This ridge was probably once used by the Brigantes, who settled in the north of England about 3000BC as one of their ancient trackways leading across the wolds to the coast.